The University of Pennsylvania Organizes Virtual Autonomous Racing Competition

June 5, 2021
Posted in What's Happening

June 5, 2021

Mobility21 academic partners at the University of Pennsylvania’s F1Tenth Team organized a Virtual Autonomous Racing Competition at Trinity College, Dublin. This was a student run event where participants submitted their racecar software agents to race against autonomous driving algorithms developed by others.

University of Pennsylvania Teams Up to Organize International Virtual Autonomous Racing Competitions

June 1, 2021
Posted in What's Happening

June 1, 2021

Members of The University of Pennsylvania’s F1Tenth autonomous racing team have teamed up with Riders.AI to conduct a series of virtual autonomous racing events.  Riders.AI has developed a professional virtual racing cloud-based platform to organize international competitions.

Mobility21 Penn Team Organizes ICRA’21 Opportunities and Challenges with Autonomous Racing Workshop

May 31, 2021
Posted in What's Happening

May 31, 2021

Mobility21 UTC researcher Rahul Mangraham from the University of Pennsylvania organized the “Opportunities and Challenges with Autonomous Racing” workshop which had over 175 participants and invited speakers from MIT, Stanford, ETHz, GTech, Caltech and others who are balancing safety and performance at the limits of perception, planning and control of autonomous racing machines.  Learn more details about the event here.

LG Silicon Valley Lab Partners with University of Pennsylvania’s F1Tenth Team

April 15, 2021
Posted in What's Happening

April 15, 2021

Members of the Mobility21 academic partners at the University of Pennsylvania’s F1Tenth team have partnered with the LG Silicon Valley Lab  to develop a F1Tenth vehicle and race track for autonomous racing in the LG SVL Simulator, which is the leading AV simulator.  Watch the simulation here.

University of Pennsylvania Professor Contributes Project Report to Urban Studies

March 15, 2021
Posted in What's Happening

March 15, 2021

Mobility21 UTC  Academic Partner and University of Pennsylvania Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning Erick Guerra contributed the project report on “How do low-income commuters get to work in US and Mexican cities? A comparative empirical assessment” to Urban Studies. The study was co-authored with doctoral fellow Shengxiao Li.

NSF Civic Innovation Challenge Stage 1 Awardees Announced

February 18, 2021
Posted in What's Happening

February 18, 2021

“The National Science Foundation (NSF), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, has awarded 52 teams of civic and academic partners $50,000 to support refinement of their civic concepts for ready-to-implement, research-based pilot projects addressing ‘Communities and Mobility’ or ‘Resilience to Natural Disaster’.”

Two Mobility21 UTC researchers were included in these awards; Megan Ryerson of the University of Pennsylvania will be leading the project, “Data-driven and Community Engaged Planning Tools For Addressing Spatial Mismatch” and  Lee Branstetter of Carnegie Mellon University will be leading “City of Bridges: Using New Transportation Options to Drive Low-Income Mothers to Greater Success in Pittsburgh.”

Mobility21 UTC Researcher Receives 2020 Green Purchasing Award

February 1, 2021
Posted in What's Happening

February 1, 2021

Mobility21 UTC researcher, Megan Ryerson of the Stuart Weitzman School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania, along with Cheryl Hickey of the School of Engineering and Applied Science are the 2020 Green Purchasing Award recipients. Ryerson collaborated with Purchasing Services on the spring 2020 Advanced Transportation Seminar in which students explored best practices to minimize travel-related emissions.

Read the full story here

University of Pennsylvania Researchers Focus on Social Dynamics & Environmental Justice

February 1, 2021
Posted in What's Happening

February 1, 2021

Mobility21 UTC researcher Meg Ryerson of the University of Pennsylvania, along with Mobility21 UTC US DOT Student of the Year Camille Boggan, are working to continue to make transportation more equitable to all in the future.

“There’s so much you’re going to miss if you’re not collecting the right data. And sometimes to do that, you have to actually ask or observe travelers themselves,” says Boggan.

Read the full article here.

University of Pennsylvania’s Autonomous Racing Team Works To Develop Full Scale Autonomous Vehicles from 1/10th Scale Autonomous Racecars

December 21, 2020
Posted in What's Happening

December 21, 2020

The University of Pennsylvania’s F1Tenth Team is now a Premier Member of The Autoware Foundation  to translate development from 1/10th scale autonomous racecars to full scale autonomous vehicles. Autoware is a leading open-source autonomous driving meta-operating system that makes it easy and efficient to convert drive-by-wire vehicles into autonomous cars. Through this partnership, Autoware is focusing on racing scenarios to further its goal of autonomous vehicles for everyone.

F1Tenth Autonomous Racing & How It Can Help with Machine Learning Research

September 29, 2020
Posted in What's Happening

September 29, 2020

Mobility21 UTC Researcher and University of Pennsylvania Professor Rahul Mangharam released a new video today on “F1Tenth Autonomous Racing and How It Can Help with Machine Learning Research for Perception, Planning and Control.”  Watch his talk here.

Offsetting Carbon Emissions, One Ton at a Time

July 21, 2020
Posted in What's Happening

July 20, 2020

Megan Ryerson, Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning and Electric and Systems Engineering and UTC researcher at the Mobility21 academic partner University of Pennsylvania, sits down with Penn Today to discuss her take on offsetting carbon emissions, one ton at a time.  “I’ve spent my career telling people to fly less. If you told me in the fall how few planes would be in the sky right now, I would have been shocked,” says Megan Ryerson.  Read the full article here.

Exploring ‘Redesigning the World’

July 3, 2020
Posted in What's Happening

July 3, 2020

Megan Ryerson, Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning and Electric and Systems Engineering at the Mobility21 academic partner University of Pennsylvania, provided her input on how to navigate post-COVID19 with Politico magazine with her suggestion, “Replace Short Flights with Buses.”

You’re traveling to a neighboring city, either to visit or to catch a connecting flight. You’re cruising along using the Wi-Fi in a clean seat at least 6 feet from your fellow passengers. You’re relaxed; since departures leave your hometown airport every hour, choosing when to travel was easy. Then, over the loudspeaker you hear a voice: “This is your captain speaking. The bus will be pulling up to the airport momentarily. Terminal A, first stop.”

Now that the coronavirus pandemic has dramatically disrupted air travel, it’s possible to imagine this strange new reality: The future of short-distance air travel may very well be the bus.

With business travel evaporating for the time being, and Americans worried about getting on crowded planes for anything but urgently necessary travel, the aviation industry is reeling. As of April 30, demand for flights from and within the United States had plummeted 95 percent from the year before; it has since held steady at the lowest levels seen since the mid-1950s. Airlines are recording unprecedented losses.

As airlines prepare for their future, they will be looking to cut unprofitable and expensive routes—specifically, those routes under 500 miles that rely on gas-guzzling regional jets. Shorter regional air routes are already so unpopular that airlines won’t serve them without expensive subsidies or direct incentives from a growing number of secondary airports. The economics of short-haul flights will get even worse if airlines choose not to fill their planes, as some are doing.

But Americans still need ways to get from city to city besides driving. Frequently run, comfortable coach bus lines could fill the void. Buses offer higher scheduling flexibility and lower capital costs; a half-filled bus represents much less of a loss than a half-filled plane. Furthermore, increased regional bus use would reduce the number of flights coming into airports—and thus reduce the number of people mingling within airports’ walls, a new and likely enduring safety priority. And while conventional buses might provide a slight fuel consumption savings compared with regional aircrafts, hybrid and electric buses are at least four times more fuel-efficient than regional jets.

To make this shift, airlines need to see themselves—or be required to see themselves as a condition of relief funding—as mobility companies and not only providers of air service. In the same way that cities and the federal government already provide incentives to airlines to fly, future Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act funding could provide incentives to airlines or startup bus companies to get regional coaches on the road. Now is the time to make a dramatic, long-lasting change in the way we travel: Airlines are being forced to be more flexible, passengers are looking for the safest alternatives, and planners and policymakers should be looking for solutions that meet our mobility, safety and environmental goals going forward.”  Read the full article here.

Rahul Mangharam Gives Keynote Banquet Speech at Comsnets

January 9, 2020
Posted in What's Happening

January 9, 2020

Rahul Mangharam, the Penn Academic Director for the Mobility21 UTC  was the featured banquet speaker today at the Comsnets 2020 conference in Bangalore, India.  He spoke about his UTC research project, Designing Safe Autonomous Systems:  A Driver’s License Test for Driverless Vehicles.

UPenn Presents at CPSWeek Conference in Montreal

April 14, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

April 14, 2019

The UPenn UTC Team including Rahul Mangharam, Matt Kelly, Yash Pant and Houssam Abbas attended the Cyber-Physical Systems and Internet-of-Things Week Conference in Canada to present their research.