The Ohio State University EcoCAR team won first place in the EcoCAR Mobility Challenge

July 5, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

May 22, 2019

The Ohio State University EcoCAR team won first place in the EcoCAR Mobility Challenge Year One Competition. This is the sixth consecutive year that Ohio State won an Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition. The competition is headline sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, General Motors and Mathworks, and managed by Argonne National Laboratory. Ohio State EcoCAR scored 887 out of 1,000 overall points. In addition to the firstplace overall finish, the team also won eight other awards including first place for its final technical report, its target market presentation, and its controls, systems modeling and simulation presentation. Learn more here. 

Traffic21 welcomes Tessa Guengerich as CMU Robotics Institute Summer Scholar

June 12, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

June 12, 2019

Traffic21 welcomes and is pleased to sponsor Tessa Guengerich as part of this year’s CMU Robotics Institute Summer Scholars (RISS) program. Currently an undergraduate student at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, she arrives in Pittsburgh hoping to learn more about machine learning and programming and learn more about the implementation of robots outside of academia.  Tessa says she is excited to learn about things she wasn’t exposed to before (computational statistics and machine learning) and is also excited to be surrounded by other students from around the world.

Carnegie Mellon’s RISS Program is an eleven-week summer (June 1 to mid-August) undergraduate research program that immerses a diverse cohort of scholars in cutting-edge robotics projects that drive innovation and have real-world impact. Launched in 2006, RISS is among the best and most comprehensive robotics research programs for undergraduates in the world.

Mobility21 Fellow Attends ENO Leadership Development Conference

June 7, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

June 2-7, 2019

Mobility21 UTC’s 2018 – 2020 Women in Transportation Fellow, Bonnie Fan, participated in the Eno Leadership Development Conference this week in Washington, DC.   Fan won a scholarship to attend the conference through the Council of University Transportation Centers.Photo of ENO Cohort

Eno is a non-partisan transportation think-tank started by William Phelps Eno, the “Father of Traffic Safety,” who famously invented the stop sign.  The Eno Leadership Development Conference is an opportunity for up and coming student leaders to tap into ENO’s strong network and leadership development programming.

Fan referred to the conference as “…something between a transportation policy crash course, a week-long networking session with industry titans, and a nerdy sleep-away camp for graduate students.”

Fan reported feeling intimidated at first but quickly started to feel at ease as the twenty students started discussing bike-ped access, VMT funding and then falling asleep to conversations about autonomous vehicle regulation. Fan noted that she learned just as much from the other fellows as she did from the sessions themselves.

The ENO learning experience is structured around a barrage of panels. Eno president Rob Puentes and Eno Weekly’s Jeff Davis provided high level insights into transportation industry trends and policy.

Photo of some ENO Fellows on Bicycles in DCThe panels balanced representation from different organizations – trades, DOT, associations, industry – as well as perspectives – political, federal, local, private. Each speaker also took time to illuminate the path they took and advice on how they got there.

The whole week’s events are considered “off the record” – which meant the panelists could speak very candidly.  The fellows learned more about the interplay between organizations, as well interesting disconnects.

Fan said one of her major takeaways was a desire to incorporate lessons and standards established in aviation around automation, operations and safety into other modes.  She is excited to take the lessons learned and connections made from this experience into her academics and work.

Learn more:

Photo of ENO Cohort in front of the US DOT

Carnegie Mellon University student, Sharika Hedge, Spending Her Summer at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center

June 3, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

June 3, 2019

Carnegie Mellon University student, Sharika Hedge, is a senior at CMU, majoring in Civil Engineering with a minor in Computer Science.  She is currently an intern at Leidos in the Transportation Solutions Division, but is spending her summer as a contractor at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center. Her team, FHWA’s Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (STOL), works on national connected and automated vehicle (CAV) research, develops new CAV technology, and increases the accessibility of these technologies to various state DoTs.  She also participated in the attended the Traffic Safety and the 5.9 GHz Band Conference in Washington D.C on June 3, 2019.

Last summer, Hedge was a CEE Summer Research Fellow at CMU’s Mobility Data Analytics Center, under the guidance of UTC Researcher Sean Qian, as well as a part-time Transportation Software Intern at Michael Baker International. Hedge’s interests are primarily in ITS, data analytics, and CAV systems. Currently, she is working on a variety of data visualization and CAV research projects this summer, including FHWA’s Cooperative Automation Research Mobility Applications (CARMA) platform.

Mobility21 Welcomes New Women in Transportation Fellow – Carlee Benhart

May 29, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

Mobility21 welcomes Women in Transportation Fellow for 2019– 2021, Carlee Benhart.

Carlee developed an interest in smart transportation, urban infrastructure, and transportation equity during her time studying Regional Planning at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. While pursuing her degree, she undertook internships with the Indiana County (PA) Office of Planning and Development where she worked as the Indiana County WalkWorks community liaison to address the challenges of introducing alternative transportation infrastructure, and with Quaker Valley Council of Governments in Allegheny County, where she served as manager of an pilot online geographic information systems implementation for the rollout of a new municipal property and structure condition assessment. After graduating, Carlee maintained her professional relationship with the Quaker Valley Council of Governments to work on the Route 65 Corridor Study Multi-Municipal Project as a research intern.

She would like to incorporate a synthesis of technical and social science methods to improve the equity of all types of mobility. Upon completion of graduate school, Carlee hopes to work to improve the accessibility and integration of a spectrum of transportation modes with humans and the built environment. She is excited for the opportunity to hone her knowledge and skills in Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College Public Policy and Management program, and to continue her academic career in transportation planning and smart mobility as a Traffic21 Women in Transportation Fellow.

Learn more about the current Women in Transportation Fellow, Bonnie Fan, here: https://mobility21.cmu.edu/about/leadership/student-leadership/.

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The Traffic21 Women in Transportation fellowship provides financial support to an incoming female student who is entering either the Carnegie Mellon University Heinz College MSPPM (Public Policy and Management) or MISM (Information Systems Management) degree programs. Female students who have demonstrated an interest and commitment to Intelligent Transportation Systems are eligible to apply for the fellowship. The fellow’s work supports the Mobility21 University Transportation Center’s activities.

Amtrak Capstone “Improving Intercity Rail Data Analytics” Advised by Stan Caldwell

May 7, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

May 7, 2019

Mobility21 Executive Director, Stan Caldwell, advised the The Heinz College Capstone project with Amtrak entitled “Improving Intercity Rail Data Analytics”.  Today, the capstone project team presented their project results, which included their examination of a variety of data sources to develop a data-driven model for identifying and marketing to new customers.

CCAC’s Bob Koch Joins Westmoreland Career & Tech Center to Discuss the Future of Automotive Jobs

May 6, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

May 6, 2019

Bob Koch, faculty at the Community College of Allegheny County, joined automotive students and their instructors at Central Westmoreland Career and Technology Center to discuss career opportunities in the automotive field including Intelligent Transportation options, Hybrid & Electric Vehicles, Connected & Autonomous Vehicles and Ride Sharing options.  The group discussed the economic impact all of this will have on their careers and how they can prepare.

Women in Transportation Fellow presents her final capstone project report entitled “Cost of Curbs”

May 3, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

May 3, 2019

Mobility21 Women in Transportation Fellow, Sarah Cho, presented her final capstone project report entitled “Cost of Curbs Final Presentation” at the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership. The presentation was attended by leaders from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh Parking, Port Authority and the City of Pittsburgh.

The Vision Zero Toolbox

April 15, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

April 15, 2019

Erick Guerra, UTC Faculty and Assistant Professor in City and Regional Planning in the School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania, was an advisor for The Vision Zero Toolbox in Philadelphia project. The project aims to help decision-makers at the local level prioritize initiatives and projects which will achieve the greatest traffic safety benefit and ensure the success of Vision Zero Philadelphia.

 

UPenn Presents at CPSWeek Conference in Montreal

April 14, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

April 14, 2019

The UPenn UTC Team including Rahul Mangharam, Matt Kelly, Yash Pant and Houssam Abbas attended the Cyber-Physical Systems and Internet-of-Things Week Conference in Canada to present their research.

Teresa Leatherow, an Elsie Hillman Honors Scholar of Traffic21, presented at Engineering Sustainability 2019

April 9, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

April 9, 2019

Teresa Leatherow, an Elsie Hillman Honors Scholar of Traffic21, presented at Engineering Sustainability 2019: A Climate for Change at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. This conference brought together scientists from academia, government, industry, and nonprofits to share results of cutting-edge research and practice directed at development of environmentally sustainable buildings and infrastructure. Teresa’s research focused on automation and long-haul trucking applications for supply chain and operations, infrastructure, and policy. Additional information: https://www.engineering.pitt.edu/mcsi/conference/

Transportation Club hosts Dinner with Women in Transportation

April 8, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

April 8, 2019

CMU Transportation Club co-hosted an event with Women in Transportation (WTS) that featured a panelists of women who currently work in the transportation industry. The panelists highlighted WTS and how students can get involved with WTS and the transportation industry.

Traffic21’s Women in Transportation Awardee Joining CMU’s Machine Learning Ph.D. Program

April 8, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

April 8, 2019

CMU’s Traffic21 and Robotics Institute Summer Scholars Program have partnered to provide talented undergraduate students mentored robotics research experiences with top scientists creating innovative solutions for transportation at Carnegie Mellon University.

Stephanie Milani, the recipient of the 2017 Women in Transportation Award funded by Traffic21, is joining the CMU Machine Learning Ph.D. program in fall 2019.

The Traffic21 scholarship enabled Stephanie to learn about computer vision and deep learning while working with Dr. Christoph Mertz. Stephanie explained how important this was in her trajectory and growth, “Before RISS, I was unfamiliar with robotics research. Through the various programs and events, RISS provides a great, overarching view of the interdisciplinary nature of robotics research, but simultaneously allows scholars to dive deeply into an area through their summer research.”

Investing in early research experiences creates an enormous impact and opportunity for new solutions and approaches that will make our communities smarter and more livable.

Congratulations Stephanie!

Mobility21 Fellow Wins CUTC Seat at Eno’s Annual Future Leaders Development Conference

April 3, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

April 3, 2019

The 2019 Eno Future Leaders Development Conference will be held in Washington D.C. from June 2-June 6, 2019 this year – and Mobility21 UTC’s Women in Transportation Fellow, Bonnie Fan, will be at the event at the winner of the CUTC’s reserved seat.

CMU Student Elyana Hurst Receives WTS Scholarship

March 29, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

March 28, 2019

Tonight the Women in Transportation Seminar (WTS) Pittsburgh Chapter held its 2019 Annual Scholarship Gala.

Elyana Hurst, a sophomore at Carnegie Mellon University majoring in Civil & Environmental Engineering and Engineering & Public Policy, with a minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies was awarded the 2019 WTS Pittsburgh Chapter Molitoris Leadership Scholarship for Undergraduates during the event.

Elyana is interested in transportation infrastructure, specifically within and around cities, and hopes to pursue research regarding autonomous vehicles. She is involved in the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Society of Women Engineers at her university, and she serves as an ambassador for the Engineering & Public Policy department.

Elyana aims to pursue a career that allows her to combine her passion for the transportation industry with her knowledge of environmental concerns and the importance of government policies.

Members of Mobility21 staff, students and deployment partners also participated in the event and were able to congratulate Elyana as she received her scholarship award.

UTC Program Manager Gets Updates on Student Projects at the University Of Pennsylvania

March 26, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

March 26, 2019

Lisa Kay Schweyer met with UTC faculty and students during her semi-annual visit to the Mobility21 academic partner, the University of Pennsylvania.  She heard presentations from students on their research on ridehailing services’ impact on transit ridership, pedestrian deaths and injuries, and predictors of cycling.

PA Rural Robotics Initiative Takes Off and Thanks CMU’s Traffic21/Mobility21 for Assistance

March 12, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

March 12, 2019

Twelve months ago, Franklin Area High School had four lonely VEX robots that students traveled around Pennsylvania and West Virginia with, searching for teams to compete against. Fast-forward to the end of this February and those four robots have 180 new companions right next door. Together they make up the Pennsylvania Rural Robotics Initiative, a consortium of 11 school districts, one technology center, and an intermediate unit that all share a common robotics platform and curriculum. Twenty-five schools, covering five counties, have found like-minded friends in higher education, business and industry, state and local government, non-profits, and regional economic and workforce development that not only support their initiative but help it to thrive.

The Traffic21 and Mobility21 Institute’s leadership team has been a trusted advisor since the conception of PA Rural Robotics and continues to look for ways to support their mission. Both faculty and graduate students from the Robotics Institute are working to bring CMU and these young STEM students together. PA Rural Robotics was also excited to find themselves partnered with a team of CMU undergraduate students as part of the Information Systems Spring Project. The Office of Outreach and Engagement have provided a menu of options that can further the CMU connections as the initiative grows. The most recent Carnegie Mellon connection was with the CMU CS Academy. PA Rural Robotics plans to introduce their member schools to the CS1 course and discuss the potential it could have in expanding computer science offerings within all of the member districts.

Elsie Hillman Scholar Presents Final Project

March 6, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

March 6, 2019

Mobility21 Elsie Hillman Scholar, Teresa Leatherow, organized the Sustainability and Transportation:  Building the Systems of Tomorrow event as her final deliverable for her research with Mobility21. The event featured panelists from the City of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh who discussed challenges, progress and the future of sustainable transportation.

Bosch Curbside Ideation Event

March 1, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

March 1, 2019

Bosch hosted a “Curbside Management Ideation Event” at Carnegie Mellon University.  Over 25 students signed up to participate.

The event kicked off at 8:30 am with “Welcome’s and Introductions” by Sylvia Vogt from Carnegie Bosch Institute and Oliver Steinig, VP Business Development and Corporate Strategy Americas at Robert Bosc.  Karina Ricks, Director of Mobility and Infrastructure from the City of Pittsburgh then shared with the participants the importance of curbside management and Pittsburgh’s specific challenges:

  • Geographically challenged roadway network with congested, narrow avenues
  • Congestion compounded by transit stops, parallel parking, and commuter traffic
  • Competition amongst various modes and users for curb space
  • Lack of universal value for curb access and allocation
  • Lack of real time curbside utilization rates

The students were assigned to one of four teams.  And after the teams received their instructions on how to conceptualize solutions to Pittsburgh mobility challenges by leveraging Bosch strengths in Video as Sensor, the students quickly got started. An observation from the VP Business Development and Corporate Strategy Americas at Bosch, Oliver Steinig was how diligently the students worked, even choosing to eat lunch with their teams to continue working on their curbside management ideas.

At the end of the day, the students’ hard work paid off. Each team presented solutions that combined Bosch sensors, sensible technology and pragmatic policy changes.

Mobility21 and Metro21 helped promote the event and engage students and were on hand for the day’s activities.

The Curbside Ideation event is an example of how industry, government, and academia can come together to create real solutions to real world problems.

Smart Mobility Challenge Project: Real-time traffic monitoring and prediction for Cranberry Township

February 15, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

February 2018

If you’ve ever traveled through Cranberry Township, you’ve probably had to wait at more than one traffic signal. Cranberry Township’s unique geographical location at the junction of Interstate 79 and the PA Turnpike (PA 376) poses unique challenges in coordinated signal operations. Furthermore, the Township operates a Coordinated Signal System that relies on historically Generated Signal Timings, coupled with real time technology to manage day to day operations on the local network.  Any scheduled or unscheduled events on the limited access highways can cause havoc with operations on roads in the business district.

Jason A. Dailey, Director of Public Works in Cranberry Township saw an opportunity with the Smart Mobility Challenge to reduce havoc and maintain efficiency. Together with CMU faculty, Sean Qian, and PhD

Sean Qian

student, Weiran Yao, the Mobility Data Analytics Center (MAC) received funding from Traffic21.  This research project incorporated real time data inputs monitored from both social media and other public data sources against historical data to trigger predictions of traffic delays at least 30 minutes ahead.  These predictions could then be directed to dynamic message boards, smart phone applications, social media, and text messages to alert the public of the anticipated delay.  These predictions also alert the Cranberry Traffic Operations

Weiran Yao

Center of the incidents to allow for pro-active adjustments to the operating traffic plan on a real-time basis.

At the conclusion of the project, in a real-world demonstration, the system proved to successfully alert the Townships traffic operators of the upcoming traffic gridlock 50 minutes in advance compared to the actual reporting time, which allowed more prompt and effective traffic management.

Dailey’s feedback after working with Traffic21 faculty Sean Qian included:

“This was another great experience working with CMU through the Traffic21 program.  Our project was able to pull existing technology and crowd-sourced data, combine it with other publicly available data that is driven by a multitude of sources including vehicle reporting data and roadway sensors, and produce a recommendation on how to manage our signal system when an event is triggered.  We are very fortunate to work with Traffic21 and MAC to help us take advantage of current technology and make sense of it, in a way that industry professionals can then turn it into real world solutions.  This project built on another project we had been working on with Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission where we developed contingency plans that were preplanned and would need to be first identified manually, and then entered manually into our traffic signal system.  What Sean and his team were able to do, was to create a program that looks locally at traffic inputs, looks regionally at what is happening, identify issues far enough in advance for us to get an alert that then would recommend what signal plan would best resolve the issue that is occurring.  While we still need to manually enter the plan, this project far exceeded our expectations and is showing us just how valuable regional data access is for us.” 

Read the Full Report from Real-Time Traffic Monitoring and Prediction for Cranberry Township: https://ppms.cit.cmu.edu/media/project_files/61-Final.pdf

Inspired by Traffic21’s years of successful collaboration with the City of Pittsburgh to become a globally recognized smart city test bed, the goal of the Smart Mobility Challenge is to demonstrate how suburban and rural communities can also benefit from a similar collaboration.  This program is supported by Carnegie Mellon University’s Traffic21 Institute and its affiliated US DOT National University Transportation Center, Mobility21.

The Smart Mobility Challenge is an opportunity to connect suburban and rural communities to the technologies and resources being developed at Carnegie Mellon University.  The first Smart Mobility Challenge was held from 2017 – 2018, and included research done in collaboration with Millvale, McKees Rocks, Bethel Park, Greensburg, Mt. Lebanon, Dormont, Cranberry Township and Lawrence County.  Learn more by clicking here.

Traffic21 is currently kicking off its Second Smart Mobility Challenge.  The goal of this year’s challenge is work with these communities to use data and analytics to solve their municipality’s mobility problems.  Representatives of municipalities and public transit operators in southwestern PA are invited to request research assistance through the 2019-2020 Smart Mobility Challenge.   Learn more by clicking here.

 

CMU PhD Students Present Poster at TRB

January 24, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 22, 2019

Two PhD students in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University presented their Mobility21 Research during the poster session at the Transportation Annual Research Board in Washington DC.  Rick Grahn’s presented his team’s poster “Public Transit Users and Behaviors in the United States: Evidence from the 2017 National Household Travel Survey” and Corey Harper presented his team’s poster “Net-Societal and Net-Private Benefits of Some Existing Crash Avoidance Technologies.”

CMU Student Participates in TRB’s Annual Transportation Camp

January 23, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 12, 2019

Carnegie Mellon University student Dhruv Mahajan, participated in the 2019 Annual Transportation Camp, part of the TRB Annual Conference. Dhruv reviews his experience as a  “great opportunity to get an informal discussion started on issues related to transportation that you care about. It is very loosely structured and serves as a very good contrast from TRB that immediately follows it. This makes the  Transportation Camp, a very unique experience. I had a great time meeting people at Transportation Camp and listening to some really interesting ideas.”  

UPenn ESE Team Wins FAA Raise Award

January 15, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 17, 2019

At the 2019 Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, the Executive Committee of the Council of University Transportation Centers on behalf of the Secretary of Transportation, Elaine L. Chao, awarded the Secretary’s RAISE Award to a student team from the University of Pennsylvania (UPENN).  The UPENN senior design team members John Kearney, Max Li, William Tam, and Sahithya Prakash and team advisor, Dr. Megan S. Ryerson, accepted their award. The Secretary’s RAISE award was created to recognize innovative scientific and engineering concepts and student achievements that have the potential to significantly impact the future of aerospace or aviation. The team focused on the design and implementation of a centralized air traffic control (ATC) system for autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (aUAVs) in order to mitigate the risk of aUAV-on-aUAV mid-air collisions.

[UPENN is an academic partner in the Mobility21 University Transportation Center.]

Students Get Together at TRB

January 14, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 14, 2019

Students from Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pennsylvania, and the Ohio State University (all academic partners of the Mobility21 UTC) made time to get together during the TRB conference in Washington DC.  Students shared information on their academic pursuits, research interests, and brainstormed ways to continue meeting and working together during the spring semester.

Carnegie Mellon University’s Traffic21 Institute Honors Two “Students of the Year”

January 12, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 12, 2019

Amelie Bonde and Kristen Scudder, were honored tonight as “Students of the Year” at the annual winter meeting of the Transportation Research Board in Washington, DC.

Annually, the United States Department of Transportation honors the most outstanding student from each participating University Transportation Center (UTC) for his/her achievements and promise for future contributions to the transportation field. Students of the year are selected based on their accomplishments in such areas as technical merit and research, academic performance, professionalism, and leadership.

Carnegie Mellon University’s Traffic21 Institute houses Mobility21, the National University Transportation Center for Improving Mobility and the T-SET National University Transportation Center for Safety. Students from CMU and University of Pennsylvania were eligible for the T-SET UTC nomination and students from CMU, University of Pennsylvania, The Ohio State University, or Community College of Allegheny County were eligible for the Mobility21 UTC nomination.

Meet our winners:

Mobility21, the National University Transportation Center for Improving Mobility Student of the Year

Amelie Bonde
Amelie Bonde

Amelie Bonde completed a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science in 2014 at Carnegie Mellon University, and is currently a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University. Amelie worked on research pertaining to a structural vibration-based building occupancy estimation system at CMU and more recently on an in-automobile heartbeat monitoring system

using vibration sensors installed in a car seat. She is an NSF Graduate Research Fellow with a focus in the area of cyber-physical systems, smart homes and devices.

Pei Zhang, Carnegie Mellon University Associate Research Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering nominated Amelie for this honor saying, “…She is an amazing researcher that has many novel ideas and will surely be a star researcher one day.”

Amelie’s research thesis is on vibration sensors on vehicle seats that can feel the movement of humans in the car. These small movements can allow for the detection of activities the person is engaged in and biometrics such as heart rate and breath rate, with an aim of assessing driver stress and distractedness.

T-SET National University Transportation Center for Safety Student of the Year

Kristen Scudder
Kristen Scudder

Kristen Scudder is pursuing a Master of City and Regional Planning with a concentration in Sustainable Infrastructure and Transportation from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to graduate school, she received her B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Southern California and spent 6 years as a structural engineer and data automation specialist on global infrastructure projects. In addition to using eye tracking to perform safe mobility research for Mobility21 Research Director Dr. Ryerson, Kristen serves on the Penn Student Transportation Club board and is a Freight and Aviation Planning Intern at The Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission.

Her nominator, Megan S. Ryerson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of City and Regional Planning, PennDesign, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, PennEngineering and Associate Dean for Research, PennDesign at the University of Pennsylvania described Kristen as “…Kristen is a standout Master of City Planning student at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. Kristen brings a rigorous background in Civil and Environmental Engineering to her urban planning education, and she is combining these fields to tackle complex issues including the design of urban transportation infrastructure for safety and designing routing plans and policies for urban freight vehicles.”

Kristen’s research focuses on planning urban infrastructure, city planners and traffic engineers use aggregate data, such as pedestrian and cyclist flow counts and the number of reported crashes per intersection, to identify critically unsafe locations. By using eye tracking data on how pedestrians and cyclists perceive surrounding infrastructure, street design convention can be expanded beyond relying on pre-set road designs and killed and seriously injured (KSI) as a metric for safety.

Educating, recruiting and training new workers is critical to managing our country’s infrastructure safely and efficiently. We strive to help develop a transportation workforce capable of designing and maintaining the complex transportation systems of tomorrow. Help us congratulate our 2018 UTC Students of the Year!

To learn more about the University Transportation Centers’ Student of the Year awards please click here: https://www.transportation.gov/utc/outstanding-students-year