Transportation Related Courses

SemesterCourse Title
LevelUnitsCourse#
College
Professor
Description
17FDecision Making Under UncertaintyG695-760HeinzJacquillat, AlexandrThis course provides an introduction to modeling and computational methods used by policy-makers, managers and analysts to support decision-making. The first half of the course focuses on deterministic optimization, and covers linear programming, network optimization and integer programming. The second half of this course introduces risk and uncertainty, and includes methods to characterize uncertainty and methods to optimize decisions under uncertainty.
17FTraffic EngineeringUG612-606EngineeringCerminara, GregThe course incorporates the initial planning side of transportation engineering with tasks such as traffic analyses, traffic studies and transportation/traffic engineering report writing.
17SSpatial Analysis in Infrastructure PlanningG12 48-781 ArchitectureKurland, KristenA Geographic Information System (GIS) integrates displays, edits, analyzes, and shares spatial data for informing decision making. Industries benefiting from GIS include architecture, business, city planning, defense and intelligence, education, government, health and human services, natural resources, public safety, transportation, utilities and communications, and urban planning/design. This course prepares students to understand, maintain, and manipulate spatial and organizational data using world leading software applications.
17SSpecial Topics: Climate Change AdaptationG6 12-749EngineeringSamaras, Constantine Engineers designing for climate change adaptation require the tools to maximize resiliency and minimize cost for existing and proposed energy, transportation, water, urban and other types of infrastructure. Students successfully completing this course will understand how climate change affects civil infrastructure and how to quantitatively incorporate resilient designs and co-benefits under uncertainty. Students will use open data to examine current adaptation engineering challenges, quantify solutions, and communicate their technical recommendations through policy briefs.
17SDecision Analytics for Business and PolicyG1212-768EngineeringJacquillat, AlexandreThis course introduces modeling frameworks and computational tools to address complex, ill-defined, large-scale decision-making problems that arise in policy and business. Using a combination of lecturing, case studies and class discussions, it covers advanced methods of decision-making under uncertainty in four major areas: large-scale optimization, discrete event simulation, stochastic optimization and queuing theory.
17SEnergy Demand and UtilizationG639-611Engineering (CIT)Samaras, Constantine This course examines how human demands for energy have evolved over time and how they differ across nations. The course begins from a historical perspective and proceeds to an evaluation of present demand and synthesis of future projections. The course focuses on the technologies used in the different sectors: housing, commerce, food, industry and transportation.
18FTraffic Engineering
UG612-600EngineeringCerminara, GregThe course incorporates the initial planning side of transportation engineering with tasks such as traffic analyses, traffic studies and transportation/traffic engineering report writing.
18FSmart Cities: Growth and Intelligent Transportation SystemsAll612-645EngineeringQian, ZhenCities all around the world are being built and re-invented as smart cities utilizing information systems and innovative applications of data analytics. One major smart cities component is transportation. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) industry is expected to grow at a rate of 19 per year and reach 5.5 Billion in annual investment by 2020. This course is supported by CMUs Traffic21 Initiative.
18FInfrastructure and Environment in a Changing World
All1212-100EngineeringSamaras, Constantinos
Smart cities, sustainable energy and buildings, connected autonomous vehicles, resilient infrastructure, climate change adaptation, and global water management are just a few of the future domains that will rely on CEEs. Students will explore how sensing, data science, environmental science, systems analysis, and infrastructure design are integrated to create a built environment that meets the needs of smart and connected communities while enhancing sustainability.
19FRobot Mobility on Air, Land, and Sea All1216-665RoboticsDolan, John
Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios
Geyer, Hartmut
Michael, Nathan
Kaess, Michael
Topics are: ground robots (terrain mechanics and autonomous driving), legged robots, aerial robots, and marine robots.
19FTraffic EngineeringUG612-606Engineering
Cerminara, Greg
Introduction to traffic engineering providing practical experience that can be used directly in the workforce. Course material will provide a solid foundation in preparing for the Transportation portion of the Professional Engineer exam.
19FNetwork Traffic AnalysisG1212-100HeinzO'Meara, KyleThe course will involve network investigation to include packet capture analysis and network flow analysis. Micro: - What is the breadth of my network? - What assets are important to my mission? - How do I perform efficient network analysis? What does the bad look like? Macro: - What are the geo-political effects of various movements across the world?
19FExploring CEE: Infrastructure and Environment in a Changing WorldAll1212-606EngineeringSamaras, ConstantinosCivil and Environmental Engineers (CEEs) engage in the planning, design, construction, operation, retrofit, demolition, and reuse of large-scale infrastructure that forms the backbone of all societies and economies. CEEs solve problems, innovate, start companies, and become global technology leaders.
19FAutonomous AgentsAll1215-482Computer ScienceSimmons, Reid
Rosenthal, Stephanie
Autonomous agents use perception, cognition, actuation, and learning to reliably achieve desired goals, where the agents can be smart homes, mobile robots, intelligent factories, self-driving cars, etc. The goal of this course is to provide students with the techniques needed for developing complete, integrated AI-based autonomous agents.
19FDesign Center: DeXign FuturesAll651.453- 51753DesignScupelli, PeterThe 21st century brings us a world that is changing at exponential rates with increased uncertainty. Products and services are designed and developed faster, and their shelf-life increasingly disrupted by new offerings. As design disciplines engage in larger, more complex societal problems, new methods and skills are necessary. In this course, students learn how to align short-term design action to long-term vision timescales.
19SSpatial Analysis in Infrastructure PlanningG1248-781ArchitectureKurland, KristenA Geographic Information System (GIS) integrates displays, edits, analyzes, and shares spatial data for informing decision making. Industries benefiting from GIS include architecture, business, city planning, defense and intelligence, education, government, health and human services, natural resources, public safety, transportation, utilities and communications, and urban planning/design. This course prepares students to understand, maintain, and manipulate spatial and organizational data using world leading software applications.
19SInfrastructure ManagementAll1212-750EngineeringQian, SeanThis course takes a broad view of infrastructure systems to include physical infrastructure and information networks. The course will consider the need to protect these critical infrastructures from both degradation as well as malicious attacks. Infrastructure management generally depends on public-private partnerships to ensure long-term viability. We will look at relevant academic literature on the topics of infrastructure needs and requirements. We will explore the use of automated sensing and computer network systems to facilitate management.
19SSensing and Data Mining for Smart Structures and SystemsAll1212-761EngineeringNoh, Young HaeThis course will introduce smart monitoring systems for applications in physical structures and systems. Such monitoring systems enable us to understand the performance of the physical systems and diagnose/prognose their critical status using technologies, such as sensor network and data analytics. Examples include structural health monitoring, traffic monitoring, water/air quality sensing, occupant monitoring, etc. The course will include lectures that provide theoretical backgrounds on data acquisition and analysis using both empirical and analytical approaches, as well as course projects to provide hands-on experience on integrating and implementing what they have learned from lectures and build a full monitoring system.
19SUrban Systems StrategyG690-741HeinzTBAWhile integrated design has made considerable progress at the individual building and site levels, increasing sustainable performance on a larger scale has remained more challenging. This class will explore processes and outcomes that provide human-centered approaches and new sets of filters for infrastructure investment. Human-centered design is a creative approach to problem solving pioneered by the design firm IDEO. It is a methodology for design and management that creates solutions to problems by involving the human perspective in all steps of the process. Traditional human-centered design in the A/E/C industry has focused on workplace strategy. This class will make the case for the value of this approach in infrastructure and system solutions for our cities.
19SThe American Railroad â?? Decline and Renaissance in the Age of Deregulationâ?All619-213EngineeringPosner, HenryThe USAs private sector freight rail industry is considered a model for the world as the result of its renaissance following deregulation in 1980. This is a stealth industry whose history and economics are both intertwined and complex. Starting with the development of the first U. S. railroads, students will gain a basic understanding of the industrys history and economics, with special attention to the past half-century.
20FPolicies of Wireless SystemsG1218-650EngineeringPeha, JonThis course will address public policy issues related to wireless systems. It investigates policies related to a wide variety of emerging wireless systems and technologies, including current and next-generation cellular systems, wifi and white space devices, emerging methods of accessing spectrum, communications systems for emergency responders (firefighters, police, emergency medical services), current and next-generation television, and satellite communications. This can include the government role in facilitating the creation of infrastructure, in advancing competition among broadcasters and communications service providers, in using scarce spectrum efficiently, in promoting public safety and homeland security, and in protecting privacy and security. Because these are inherently interdisciplinary issues, the course will include detailed discussions of technology, economics, and law, with no prerequisites in any of these areas. This course is cross-listed as 18-650, 19-403, 19-713, and 95-824. Senior or graduate standing required.
20FSmart Cities: Growth and Intelligent Transportation SystemsAll612-645EngineeringQian, ZhenCities all around the world are being built and re-invented as smart cities utilizing information systems and innovative applications of data analytics. One major smart cities component is transportation. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) indus
20FTraffic EngineeringUG612-606EngineeringCerminara, GregThe course incorporates the initial planning side of transportation engineering with tasks such as traffic analyses, traffic studies and transportation/traffic engineering report writing.
20FNetwork Traffic AnalysisG1295-855HeinzO'Meara, KyleThe course will involve network investigation to include packet capture analysis and network flow analysis. Micro: - What is the breadth of my network? - What assets are important to my mission? - How do I perform efficient network analysis? What does the bad look like? Macro: - What are the geo-political effects of various movements across the world?
20FInfrastructure and Environment in a Changing World
All1212-100EngineeringSamaras, Constantinos
Smart cities, sustainable energy and buildings, connected autonomous vehicles, resilient infrastructure, climate change adaptation, and global water management are just a few of the future domains that will rely on CEEs. Students will explore how sensing, data science, environmental science, systems analysis, and infrastructure design are integrated to create a built environment that meets the needs of smart and connected communities while enhancing sustainability.
20FAutonomous AgentsAll1215-482Computer ScienceSimmons, Reid
Rosenthal, Stephanie
Autonomous agents use perception, cognition, actuation, and learning to reliably achieve desired goals, where the agents can be smart homes, mobile robots, intelligent factories, self-driving cars, etc. The goal of this course is to provide students with the techniques needed for developing complete, integrated AI-based autonomous agents.
20SIntroduction to Geographical Information SystemsUG667-279Dietrich College of InformationWeinberg, RandyGeographical Information Systems (GIS) allow us to visualize information that uses location. Through displaying layers of information in computer generated maps, we can see, analyze, understand and explore spatial patterns and relationships in new and novel ways. People in many different fields use Geographical Information Systems in their work: for visualizing the environment, human development, demographics, traffic and transportation, public health and many more. In this course, students will learn the basics of GIS through hands-on experience with popular mapping tools. Sources of data, principles of coordinate and projection systems and elementary geo-analysis techniques will be included. Upon completion of the course, students will have the background to begin using GIS techniques in their own areas of interest and will be prepared for further study in advanced GIs courses.
20SGIS/CAFM948-569ArchitectureKurland, KristenA Geographic Information System (GIS) integrates displays, edits, analyzes, and shares spatial data for informing decision making. Industries benefiting from GIS include architecture, business, city planning, defense and intelligence, education, government, health and human services, natural resources, public safety, transportation, utilities and communications, and urban planning/design. GIS topics include map design and outputs, geodatabases, downloading and importing spatial and attribute data, digitizing, geocoding, and advanced spatial, 3D, and network analysis. Other topics such as raster-vector integration and web-based GIS will also be covered. Facilities management is the practice of coordinating the physical workplace with the people and work of the organization. Computer Aided Facilities Management (CAFM) integrates software tools to streamline operations, boost productivity and develop strategic planning goals for an organization. CAFM topics include space management, asset management, building operations, emergency preparedness, environmental health and safety, telecommunications, and real property and lease management. This course prepares students to understand, maintain, and manipulate spatial and organizational data using world leading software applications. By the end of the course, students will have sufficient background to identify spatial characteristics of diverse application areas enabling them to integrate spatial thinking and analysis into their academic research and careers.
20SSpatial Analysis in Infrastructure PlanningG1248-781ArchitectureKurland, KristenA Geographic Information System (GIS) integrates displays, edits, analyzes, and shares spatial data for informing decision making. Industries benefiting from GIS include architecture, business, city planning, defense and intelligence, education, government, health and human services, natural resources, public safety, transportation, utilities and communications, and urban planning/design. This course prepares students to understand, maintain, and manipulate spatial and organizational data using world leading software applications.
20SCities, Technology and the Environment690-765HeinzTarr, JoelThis mini will explore the interaction of cities, technology and the natural environment over time. More specifically, it will consider several major issues confronting cities today: (1) water supply, wastewater and storm water disposal and flooding; (2) Energy and Environment; (3) Transportation, suburbanization and land use; and (4) Brownfield creation and development. In a number of instances, the Pittsburgh region will be used to provide examples of these issues. These themes will be approached through a combination of class discussions, lectures, and visiting speakers. Class participation is expected, and will comprise a portion of the grade. Students will be expected to prepare a problem-oriented paper on one of the areas focused on in the course.
21SRoboticsAll1216-883Computer ScienceLiu, ChangliuSafe autonomy has become increasingly critical in many application domains. It is important to ensure not only the safety of the ego robot, but also the safety of other agents (humans or robots) that directly interact with the autonomy. For example, robots should be safe to human workers in human-robot collaborative assembly; autonomous vehicles should be safe to other road participants. For complex autonomous systems with many degrees of freedom, safe operation depends on the correct functioning of all system components, i.e., accurate perception, optimal decision making, and safe control. This course deals with both the design and the verification of safe robotic systems. From the design perspective, we will talk about how to assure safety through planning, prediction, learning, and control. From the verification perspective, we will talk about verification of deep neural networks, safety or reachability analysis for closed loop systems, and analysis of multi-agent systems.
21SThe American Railroad â?? Decline and Renaissance in the Age of Deregulationâ?All619-213EngineeringPosner, HenryThe USAs private sector freight rail industry is considered a model for the world as the result of its renaissance following deregulation in 1980. This is a stealth industry whose history and economics are both intertwined and complex. Starting with the development of the first U. S. railroads, students will gain a basic understanding of the industrys history and economics, with special attention to the past half-century.
21SIntroduction to Geographical Information SystemsUG667-279Dietrich College of InformationWeinberg, RandyGeographical Information Systems (GIS) allow us to visualize information that uses location. Through displaying layers of information in computer generated maps, we can see, analyze, understand and explore spatial patterns and relationships in new and novel ways. People in many different fields use Geographical Information Systems in their work: for visualizing the environment, human development, demographics, traffic and transportation, public health and many more. In this course, students will learn the basics of GIS through hands-on experience with popular mapping tools. Sources of data, principles of coordinate and projection systems and elementary geo-analysis techniques will be included. Upon completion of the course, students will have the background to begin using GIS techniques in their own areas of interest and will be prepared for further study in advanced GIs courses.
21SResilient & Sustainable CommunitiesG1290-489HeinzMehalik, MatthewThis course is a parallel listing for the graduate level listing of 90-789 under the same title. The course examines past and current community development topics and trends associated with creating and/or maintaining sustainable communities. Such topics include sustainable development, creative capitalism, regional planning and visioning, governance, regional equitable development, sustainable business practices, green/clean tech, smart growth and smart transportation, carbon management, resource conservation, local living economies, energy systems and strategies, dynamics of neighborhoods, among other topics. Emphasis will fall on how these various dimensions need to strategically align to promote sustainable communities amidst their complexities. The class will also delve into a variety of green and sustainable development practices to provide frameworks for integrating traditional community development practices with sustainable development practices. The class takes lessons from the past (both what has worked and what did not work) as well as appropriate, current practices and explores how to apply them to a variety of community situations and conditions. The focus is on urban communities in the U.S and worldwide, both large and small. The course includes experiential, hands-on learning (projects, case studies, analyses, presentations, field trips, and guest lectures) as well as reflective components (readings, discussion, and papers).
21SCities, Technology and the Environment690-765HeinzThis mini will explore the interaction of cities, technology and the natural environment over time. More specifically, it will consider several major issues confronting cities today: (1) water supply, wastewater and storm water disposal and flooding; (2) Energy and Environment; (3) Transportation, suburbanization and land use; and (4) Brownfield creation and development. In a number of instances, the Pittsburgh region will be used to provide examples of these issues. These themes will be approached through a combination of class discussions, lectures, and visiting speakers. Class participation is expected, and will comprise a portion of the grade. Students will be expected to prepare a problem-oriented paper on one of the areas focused on in the course.
21SResilient & Sustainable CommunitiesG1290-789HeinzMehalik, MatthewThis course examines past and current community development topics and trends associated with creating and/or maintaining sustainable communities. Such topics include sustainable development, creative capitalism, regional planning and visioning, governance, regional equitable development, sustainable business practices, green/clean tech, smart growth and smart transportation, carbon management, resource conservation, local living economies, energy systems and strategies, dynamics of neighborhoods, among other topics. Emphasis will fall on how these various dimensions need to strategically align to promote sustainable communities amidst their complexities. The class will also delve into a variety of green and sustainable development practices to provide frameworks for integrating traditional community development practices with sustainable development practices. The class takes lessons from the past (both what has worked and what did not work) as well as appropriate, current practices and explores how to apply them to a variety of community situations and conditions. The focus is on urban communities in the U.S and worldwide, both large and small. The course includes experiential, hands-on learning (projects, case studies, analyses, presentations, field trips, and guest lectures) as well as reflective components (readings, discussion, and papers).
21SElectric Vehicles: Technology, Economics, Environment & PolicyG1219-668HeinzMichalek, JeremyIn this course, students will read academic literature, government documents, and popular press to develop a broad understanding of the technology, economic, environmental and policy dimensions of electric vehicles. Topics may include (1) TECHNOLOGY: Battery technology, design, application, degradation and innovation; electric vehicle technologies and designs; the electric power grid; (2) ECONOMICS: cost; consumer behavior; infrastructure; electricity dispatch; automotive externalities; the Gruenspecht effect; (3) ENVIRONMENT: life cycle assessment; air pollution; greenhouse gas emissions; marginal grid emission factors; renewables; vehicle to grid; hydrogen; (4) POLICY: effectiveness, efficiency, uncertainty and equity; short-run versus long-run effects; fleet standards; incentives; mandates; policy interactions; intellectual property; and policies in the US, China, EU, Japan, and local jurisdictions. Fundamentals covered at an introductory level to support readings may include time value of money, economies of scale, social welfare analysis, externalities, valuation of reduced mortality risk; choice modeling, regression, life cycle assessment, optimization, game theory, and other topics. Fluency with algebra and calculus is assumed.
21SSystems SynthesisG1290-739HeinzThe Systems Synthesis sequence of courses 90-739 and 90-740 is intended to provide an opportunity for students to work together intensively on the design of a specific functioning system. The term System refers to the fact that the particular entity studied has an identifiable objective or function and the word Synthesis refers to the fact that the desired output is an integrated design for students to gain experience and understanding in the formulation and solution of problems in the public sector. In doing this students have an opportunity to integrate the facts and techniques they have learned and put them to a practical test. The operation of the course involves the class in the definition and solution of one or more major public problems. The class examines these problems from relevant viewpoints including the definition of system objectives user requirements as well as the examination of technological and procedural alternatives in designing the systems and consideration of the political problems in implementing solutions. 
21SInfrastructure and Environment in a Changing World
All1212-100EngineeringGregory, Kelvin
Civil and Environmental Engineers (CEEs) engage in the planning, design, construction, operation, retrofit, demolition, and reuse of large-scale infrastructure that forms the backbone of all societies and economies. CEEs work at the dynamic interface of the built environment, information environment, and natural environment. Therefore, societal domains that require CEE expertise include smart cities and construction, sustainable energy and buildings, connected and automated transportation systems, resilient infrastructure, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and water management. Students will explore how sensing, data science, environmental science, life cycle systems and economic analysis, and infrastructure design are integrated to create a built environment that meets the needs of smart and connected communities while enhancing sustainability. Students work on team-based design-build projects that introduce principles from environmental, structural, construction engineering, and project management. Students learn technical skills as well as methods for management and design considerations that include uncertainty, economics, and ethics, for modern and future infrastructure. 1 hr. lab.
21SFoundations of Intelligent Infrastructure SystemsG1212-774EngineeringFlanigan, KatherineThe proliferation of low-cost and high-performing sensors, advancements in wireless communication, and ubiquitous access to cloud computing services have led to the emergence of intelligent infrastructure systems. Intelligent infrastructure systems are those systems in which civil and environmental engineering professionals combine sensing, computing, and actuation to enhance the performance, resilience, accessibility, and sustainability of infrastructure systems. These infrastructure systems are often of significant economic importance, dynamic (with a time basis to their behavior), and comprise complex interactions between cyber, physical, natural, and social components. This course conveys recent advancements enabling intelligent infrastructure systems and serves as a rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of dynamic systems theory applied to infrastructure systems. The systems science introduced in this course emphasizes modeling dynamic systems as continuous and discrete-time systems (Laplace domain and Z-domain system models, respectively), transformation methods between the time and frequency domains, feedback control of dynamic systems, and state space system models. Coursework and examples will be drawn from applications in modeling, monitoring, and controlling structural, transportation, hydraulic, and electrical systems.
21SInfrastructure ManagementAll1219-617EngineeringQian, SeanThis course takes a broad view of infrastructure systems to include physical infrastructure and information networks. The course will consider the need to protect these critical infrastructures from both degradation as well as malicious attacks. Infrastructure management generally depends on public-private partnerships to ensure long-term viability. We will look at relevant academic literature on the topics of infrastructure needs and requirements. We will explore the use of automated sensing and computer network systems to facilitate management.
21FSpecial Topics: Intro to Transportation Systems AnalysisAll612-644EngineeringQian, SeanThis course covers fundamentals of planning, design and operation of roadway transportation and public transportation. Topics covered include basic traffic flow theory, traffic signal design and evaluation, transportation planning, pricing of transportation systems, and basic data analytics techniques. The objective is to develop the capability to: 1) understand the principles of transportation planning, transportation economics and system management; 2) analyze transportation systems with emerging mobility data; and 3) apply methodologies to solve transportation system problems and develop management strategies/policies.
21FSmart Cities: Growth and Intelligent Transportation SystemsAll612-645EngineeringQian, SeanCities all around the world are being built and re-invented as smart cities utilizing information systems and innovative applications of data analytics. One major smart cities component is transportation. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) industry is expected to grow at a rate of 19 per year and reach 5.5 Billion in annual investment by 2020. This shifting dynamic provides great opportunity for improved transportation safety and efficiency but also poses challenging information systems and public policy challenges. Furthermore, there are new opportunities for professional-school graduates outside of engineering schools for employment in transportation planning and policy. This course is supported by CMUs Traffic21 Initiative and Technologies for Safe and Efficient Transportation (T-SET) University Transportation Center. Classes will feature guest lectures provided by T-SET faculty and industry and government ITS professionals.
21FExploring CEE: Infrastructure and Environment in a Changing WorldAll1212-100EngineeringGregory, Kelvin
Civil and Environmental Engineers (CEEs) engage in the planning, design, construction, operation, retrofit, demolition, and reuse of large-scale infrastructure that forms the backbone of all societies and economies. CEEs work at the dynamic interface of the built environment, information environment, and natural environment. Therefore, societal domains that require CEE expertise include smart cities and construction, sustainable energy and buildings, connected and automated transportation systems, resilient infrastructure, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and water management. Students will explore how sensing, data science, environmental science, life cycle systems and economic analysis, and infrastructure design are integrated to create a built environment that meets the needs of smart and connected communities while enhancing sustainability. Students work on team-based design-build projects that introduce principles from environmental, structural, construction engineering, and project management. Students learn technical skills as well as methods for management and design considerations that include uncertainty, economics, and ethics, for modern and future infrastructure.
21FCEE Infrastructure Systems in ActionAll212-233EngineeringRounce, DavidCivil and environmental engineering infrastructure is all around us. CEE infrastructure is integral to societys day-to-day operations, providing, for example, shelter, transportation, and clean drinking water. In this course, students will get a first-hand experience of civil and environmental engineering in action all around us. The course is comprised of lab sessions during which students will learn about and investigate infrastructure and phenomena in the built and natural environments on or near campus. Student coursework includes short assignments and reflections related to the lab experience.
21FSmart Cities: Growth and Intelligent Transportation SystemsAll694-845HeinzQian, SeanCities all around the world are being built and re-invented as smart cities utilizing information systems and innovative applications of data analytics. One major smart cities component is transportation. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) industry is expected to grow at a rate of 9 per year and reach 45 Billion in annual investment by 2023 (Greenenergy24, 2017). This shifting dynamic provides great opportunity for improved transportation safety and efficiency but also poses challenging information systems and public policy challenges. Furthermore, there are new opportunities for professional-school graduates outside of engineering schools for employment in transportation planning and policy. This course is supported by CMUs Traffic21 Institute Mobility21 National University Transportation Center. Classes will feature guest lectures provided by Traffic21/Mobility21 faculty and industry and government ITS professionals.
21FIntro to Transportation Systems AnalysisAll694-893HeinzQian, SeanThis course covers fundamentals of planning, design and operation of roadway transportation and public transportation. Topics covered include basic traffic flow theory, traffic signal design and evaluation, transportation planning, pricing of transportation systems, and basic data analytics techniques. The objective is to develop the capability to: 1) understand the principles of transportation planning, transportation economics and system management; 2) analyze transportation systems with emerging mobility data; and 3) apply methodologies to solve transportation system problems and develop management strategies/policies.
21FConnected CommunitiesG648-676ArchitectureByrne, DaraghThis graduate seminar examines the space between the smart city and smart home. It asks what are the ways in which hyperlocal systems and information can reveal and engage communities? To do this, we will explore topics across research and practice in urban informatics, ubiquitous computing, and smart and connected infrastructure applied to understanding and networking communities. The first five weeks of this mini will introduce a series of topical readings, cases, guest lectures, case studies, and design exercises. This will invite students to critically examine the relationships between smart objects and systems with the people, places, and publics that surround them. The rest of the course will examine a set of topics and issues selected by students.
21FPlanning and Public Policy for the Future of Urbanism48-742ArchitectureGastil, Ray
The focus of this seminar is the connection between policy, planning, and the design of regions, cities, neighborhoods, including to the scale of the individual project or building. International, federal, state, and local policy and planning all impact urban design and communities. Built form and urban landscapes, from new housing and university campuses to reused factories and brownfield developments, respond to overarching urban models and plans as well as to detailed incentives, regulations and review processes driven by social, economic, and environmental aims. This course addresses these relationships first by studying the overarching frameworks, from local zoning to global sustainable development goals. Through the lens of contemporary planning and urban design practice and research, it analyzes the fundamental premises of planning from housing to transportation, while also studying emerging models and practices responding to the imperatives of climate change, socioeconomic equity, community empowerment, and ubiquitous information. The seminar draws on research, teaching, and practice relevant to international, North American, and Pittsburgh perspectives. The course is organized by four modules: 1) Challenge and Frameworks; 2) Existing and Future Strategies; Innovation and its Alternatives; and 4) Project Proposals.
21FGeographic Information SystemsAll1212-783HeinzHarper, CoreyGeographic Information Systems (GIS) are information systems specifically designed to store and analyze geographic data. GIS represents almost all elements on the earth, such as roadways, rivers, utilities, cities, mountains, natural resources, energy infrastructure and so forth. GIS is used to visualize, analyze and compute the data about the world and human activities. What makes GIS different from other IS is that the data is stored and visualized on a map. The spatial analysis on the map reveals unique patterns in the geographic scope, which is the main advantage over table or text based data representation.
21FSeminar on Transportation Engineering & EconomicsAllEngineeringWhitefoot, KateThis reading and discussion seminar will provide a broad introduction to current research topics in transportation engineering and economics. Students will gain exposure to technology developments and economic forces influencing the social benefits and costs of transportation. Example topics may include energy use, emissions, traffic fatalities, congestion, and equitable mobility access.