Smart cities will be built on zero trust

November 15, 2019

Ultimately, at a time when threats can come from anywhere, smart city leaders must question the security of their technology, software solutions and systems. They must establish what is called a “zero-trust” cyber policy that verifies the stability and security of every file and every device.

A zero-trust mentality means every file and every device – including data and technology associated with smart cities – pose a threat that must be authenticated at all times. Only such a singular focus on threat prevention and process creation will mitigate risks.

Today, many cities struggle with IoT security because there aren’t any widely accepted security standards or processes to follow. The National Institute of Standards and Technology recently established an IoT-enabled smart cities framework to address cybersecurity, data sharing and integration, and New York City is preparing to publish best practice IoT guidelines in 2020. But these are suggested standards, not requirements for implementing smart-city technology.
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Designing bicycle facilities for rural communities

November 14, 2019

The need for improved bicycle facilities in rural communities is becoming more apparent, but the standard national bicycle design guide is aimed at larger urban communities rather than smaller rural communities. MPC researchers at the University of Wyoming used current design guides to develop a resource focused on rural communities to aid in making design choices about bicycle transportation facilities The resource addresses the key challenges faced by rural communities that want to expand bicycle facilities: severe funding limitations, fewer staff engineers, and differences in population characteristics and the mixes of vehicles on the road compared with more urban areas.
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The Car Key Is Fading Into Irrelevance With Wireless Technology Like UltraWideband

November 14, 2019

Recently NXP and Volkswagen announced that they would begin using ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to provide faster, more secure localization and access capabilities. A new VW model launching in 2019 will use a key fob with UWB and NXP has just launched a new automotive grade UWB chip to support a variety of applications. The NCJ29D5 UWB chip is the first of a range of chips from NXP to go along with its Bluetooth, wifi, NFC and DSRC hardware that will provide ever more wireless connectivity.

In addition to the usual key functions, equipping a car with UWB can enable a range of new functions such as automated valet parking, automatic billing for EV charging or fuel fill, other drive through payments and even short range radar systems.
With smartphones like the new iPhone 11 series now coming to market with UWB built-in, they can be used as more secure digital keys.
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5 Amazing Snapshots of the Global Connected Car Revolution

November 14, 2019

To keep up with the fast-paced modern world, the automotive industry has had to take necessary steps towards the many different technological advancements that are now available. Different parts of the world are contributing in various ways to the connected car revolution.

Here are five snapshots of how the automotive industry is moving towards the connected future and how different places around the globe are contributing and adjusting to it…

Technological advancements such as the Internet of Things and Artificial Intelligence are taking it to a whole new level. The goal of a connected car revolution is now a fact. As you can see from the snapshots above, different parts of the world have their way to adapt and make use of it. However, one thing is for sure, no matter which country they are produced in, vehicles are now all about software.
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This radar system could finally put an end to children dying in hot cars

November 14, 2019

A new A.I.-powered device developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo can reportedly detect unattended children — and animals — left alone in vehicles with 100% accuracy. The experimental technology uses a combination of radar and cutting-edge machine learning to make its predictions — which could potentially save lives.

“We developed a life-detecting sensor using contactless monitoring of the changes on the body surface,” Hajar Abedi, a PhD candidate who worked on the project, told Digital Trends. “[We look at] the characteristic movement of a living body, such as respiration, with the employment of electromagnetic waves. We used a low-cost, low-power millimeter-wave frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar sensor for this purpose. We [also] developed an algorithm to identify occupied seats, [tracking] the number of occupants and their positions.”
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GM Patents a Smart Stop/Start System to Reduce Drivers’ Annoyance

November 14, 2019

If you own a car that was made within approximately the past five years and is equipped with an automatic transmission, chances are high that you have a vehicle equipped with a stop/start system. The chance that you find this system annoying at times is also quite high; many drivers complain about how intrusive the system can be, cutting out power at every stoplight and annoying the occupants inside the vehicle. We spotted a patent dated October 29, filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office by General Motors, with a clever solution to curb some of the complaints people have about the system. It uses location devices and cameras to analyze the car’s surroundings to determine if the system should be activated.
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U.S. Transportation Secretary Says CMU Research Will Help Address Automated Vehicle Concerns

November 14, 2019

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao said Carnegie Mellon University is leading the way in automated transportation research on a visit to Pittsburgh Thursday, citing $8.4 million Department of Transportation grants the university received in conjunction with PennDOT.

“Pennsylvania received the largest of the automated driving system’s grants,” Chao said during a Thursday-afternoon speech at CMU. “This demonstration project will study the safe integration of automated driving technology into work zones. That’s so important, because a disproportionate number of roadway workers and first responders are hurt in work zones.”

Chao spoke at an event celebrating the 10-year anniversary of Traffic21, an institute at CMU intended to create an “intelligent transportation system” in the Pittsburgh region.

Chao said new transportation technology like automated vehicles will only grow in the future, though she recognized the public’s distrust of and uncertainty about it.
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CMU celebrates 10 years of Traffic21 innovations

November 14, 2019

What started 10 years ago after late Pittsburgh philanthropist Henry L. Hillman saw an article in the Wall Street Journal about reducing traffic congestion has grown into a research institute that regularly produces world-class transportation innovations and has spun off several thriving businesses.

Carnegie Mellon University celebrated the 10-year anniversary Thursday of Traffic21, its transportation research institute that has spearheaded research in self-driving vehicles and smart traffic signals and helped communities and organizations solve traffic problems. The university is the host of a 10-Year Anniversary Symposium on Thursday and Friday to discuss emerging transportation technology and how best to deploy it.
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Are Automotive Technicians Ready for a Self-Driving, Electrified Future?

November 14, 2019

In the past, all someone needed was a set of wrenches and a little aptitude to become a mechanic. With zero formal education, backyard tinkerers were able to turn their passion into a successful career.

But that’s no longer the case. Today’s cars are so complex that mechanics, now referred to as automotive technicians, need to be part IT professional to work on them. What’s more, because technology is advancing so rapidly, autoworkers will need to be even savvier to survive. Post-high-school education will be key for technicians to succeed in tomorrow’s economy and automotive landscape.

In other words: The industry is changing—in a big way. And the very definition of an automotive technician is changing along with it.

If you think self-driving vehicles are decades away, think again. Even entry-level cars, such as the 2018 Toyota Corolla, offer some level of autonomy.
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For a self-driving future, it’s not just the tech we need to get right

November 14, 2019

Self-driving vehicles have the potential to improve safety and reshape cities to transport people more efficiently. But to reach that future, we have work to do. Public and private stakeholders, including rideshare companies, public transit operators and local, state and federal governments must work together to create consistent industry regulations and streamline the testing and deployment of autonomous vehicles.

Early on, Lyft was on the front lines, working with local, state and federal regulators to introduce ridesharing to cities and towns across the country — many of which were governed by a patchwork of rules.

For example, when Lyft introduced the Amp, a light-up device that better connects riders to their corresponding vehicle, its deployment was delayed in the greater Washington DC metropolitan area. because regulations in Virginia did not align with those of Maryland and DC, and rides often span across the region.
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Northeast Ohio planners proposing a second hyperloop project to link Pittsburgh to Chicago via Cleveland

November 14, 2019

A second proposed hyperloop system has emerged to connect Pittsburgh with Chicago via high-speed capsules propelled through low-pressure tubes, this one taking a path through Cleveland rather than Columbus.

The Great Lakes Hyperloop System, which is being pursued by the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency and California-based Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, initially included only planning between Cleveland and Chicago. But in September, Pittsburgh was added to the process after the Richard King Mellon Foundation donated $100,000 to the project.
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Driving Tests Coming for Autonomous Cars

November 14, 2019

On 7 November, the International Telecommunications Union announced the formation of a focus group called AI for Autonomous and Assisted Driving. It’s aim: to develop performance standards for artificial intelligence (AI) systems that control self-driving cars. (The ITU has come a long way since its 1865 founding as the International Telegraph Union, with a mandate to standardize the operations of telegraph services.)

ITU intends the standards to be “an equivalent of a Turing Test for AI on our roads,” says focus group chairman Bryn Balcombe of the Autonomous Drivers Alliance. A computer passes a Turing Test if it can fool a person into thinking it’s a human. The AI test is vital, he says, to assure that human drivers and the AI behind self-driving cars understand each other and predict each other’s behaviors and risks.
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Autonomous car safety group proposes human operator training and oversight

November 14, 2019

Self-driving cars are basically in the Wild West right now. Sure, there are some federal guidelines, but mostly, it’s patchwork stuff that varies from state to state. The Automated Vehicle Safety Consortium was founded by US automakers to try and change that.

The group’s latest proposal surrounds human operators and best practices for those tasked with overseeing Level 4 and Level 5 self-driving cars. These are the autonomous cars that (when working perfectly) do not need any human assistance, but their development requires people who can take control if they begin to malfunction…

The AVSC formed this past April in the wake of last year’s deadly crash involving an Uber self-driving car prototype and a pedestrian crossing outside of the crosswalk. Founding members of the organization include General Motors, Toyota and Ford. Since then, numerous others have joined, including Honda, Daimler and Uber itself.
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Unique service helping areas with limited public transportation

November 14, 2019

What happens if you rely on public transportation to get work, but it doesn’t get you close enough?

There’s a service in the airport corridor that’s looking to expand its coverage area to help more people, and Carnegie Mellon University is helping them figure out the best way to do it…

CMU professor Sean Qian and his students are studying whether pickup and dropoff locations should change or if they can create an app so riders can report their location.

It’s the second year the university is doing what it calls a Smart Mobility Challenge to help suburban communities dealing with mobility issues.

“It’s very exciting that CMU researchers such as me … that we can use the technologies that was in the research in the university, and then we can try to apply the technology and test the technology in the real-world environment,” Qian said.
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Smart infrastructure to harvest energy from roads

November 13, 2019

The ‘SMART Connected Community: Live Labs’ project will focus on Aylesbury with input from researchers from Lancaster University’s Department of Engineering…

The Live Labs project will test technological advances encompassing wireless communication sensors, smart materials, and energy generation and storage.

Smart cement mixture turns buildings into batteries

Researchers from Lancaster University’s Department of Engineering will design, fabricate and test smart roads that generate power using piezoelectricity and hydromechanical dynamics from passing cars, trucks and buses.

The electricity harvested by the ‘smart’ roads will be stored by roadside batteries to power street lamps, road signs, air pollution monitors, plus sensors that detect when potholes are forming.

In addition, the smart roads will generate data on vehicle speeds, the types of vehicle travelling along the roads, as well as other information on traffic flows.
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Bye Aero, Oxis Work To Boost Electric Aircraft Flight Times

November 13, 2019

Bye Aerospace and Oxis Energy have begun a 12-month collaborative program to develop lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries they believe will allow electric aircraft to fly between 50 to 100 percent longer on a single charge. Development work will involve both ground and flight testing of Oxis’s Li-S batteries on Bye’s existing eFlyer prototype.

According to UK-based Oxis, its Li-S technology will deliver a twofold decrease in the weight of batteries due to having a higher gravimetric energy density (in excess of 500 Wh/kg at 20Ah capacity) than lithium-ion batteries. This will result in increased flight durations, it claims.
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Ford seeks OK to test C-V2X using DSRC spectrum in California, Michigan

November 13, 2019

Ford Motor Company is asking the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for permission to operate Cellular-V2X (C-V2X) prototype gear in frequencies allocated to Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) service.

Ford has been one of the biggest proponents of C-V2X over DSRC. Because the FCC’s rules currently don’t permit C-V2X in the 5.9 GHz band, the 5G Automotive Association (5GAA) has filed a request with the FCC to allow for initial deployments of C-V2X in the 5.905-5.925 GHz portion of the 5.9 GHz band. That request is still pending.

Other auto makers, like Toyota, are gung-ho for DSRC and continue to lobby for it to remain in tact. Spectrum in the 5.9 GHz band was allocated to DSRC a couple decades ago, but little transpired until recently, when others started eyeing the spectrum for other uses.
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Rural zones: car-free, or test-beds for driverless vehicle technology?

November 13, 2019

The Lake District national park authority has confirmed it will explore car-free zones as part of its traffic management plans in the national park in tandem with the National Trust. Thomas Burditt, National Trust general manager for the North Lakes, told the Times: ‘We need to address traffic issues in the national park.’

‘Car-free zones are an option we are considering. We are in discussions with residents, the Highways Agency and the parish council. The move is understood to be inspired by similar traffic management schemes employed by Alpine resorts, says The Times.

It has also been suggested that national parks and rural areas offer ‘an opportunity to take a lead in redefining public transport using less risky and contentious rural areas to develop and refine driverless vehicle technology’, comments consultant Nick Bromley in a letter to LTT this week.
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City of Vancouver turns to tech to help ease traffic congestion

November 13, 2019

The City of Vancouver is hoping technology can help ease congestion and is enlisting the help of strategists, designers, technologists and transportation professionals to participate in a three-day collaborative workshop.

“Hackathon decode congestion” asked participants to work in teams to develop a data-based solution that will improve the city’s transportation network…

The top three ideas at the Hackathon get cash prizes. First place gets $5,000, second place gets $2,000 and third place walks away with $500.

Last year’s Hackathon, which focused on safety, resulted in one of the teams signing a contract with the city to develop an app for safe walking routes to school.
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ITS America launches global competition to develop future transportation leaders

November 13, 2019

ITS America’s new Emerging Leaders Program (ELP), which will culminate at next year’s ITSWC in Los Angeles, hopes to identify potential leaders who will become part of the future intelligent transportation workforce. The ELP has three components:

A Global Challenge for college students with a finals event in Los Angeles at the ITS World Congress;
A National Immersion Program for high school students across the country;
A Local Awareness Program, which will provide opportunities for high school students in the Los Angeles metropolitan area to visit the exhibition floor.

The Global Challenge is a new program specifically developed for the 2020 ITSWC. Organizers will recruit teams of university students from across the world to solve a mobility puzzle, potentially related to the upcoming 2028 Olympics in Los Angeles.
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With all of the amenities of a mini city, research takes flight at Pittsburgh International Airport

November 13, 2019

Carnegie Mellon University’s research partnership with Allegheny County Airport Authority began six years ago where most trips start: in the parking lot.

In 2013, School of Computer Science Research Professor Alex Hauptmann pulled into Pittsburgh International Airport’s giant parking lot. Round and round he drove, up and down the lanes. Minutes passed, as did dozens of filled parking spots. Finally, he found an empty one. And an idea.

“There had to be a better way,” Hauptmann remembers. “So I approached the airport with a concept to make parking easier.”

Hauptmann and his students developed an app that used real-time parking information that detected available spaces, tracked cars and enabled navigation.

And so began a collaboration between the university and Pittsburgh International that has since produced nearly a dozen other projects, from understanding how people get around the airport to what they buy.
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HOW TO BUY AN ELECTRIC BIKE

November 13, 2019

We here at The Verge love electric rideables. Hoverboards, skateboards, scooters, motorcycles, mopeds, unicycles, tricycles… you name it, we’ve ridden it. But electric bikes belong in a category of their own because they’re more than just a fun tech fad. They could actually be the future of transportation.

Of course, e-bikes aren’t new or without controversy. Some feel threatened by the rising popularity of e-bikes, as though standard bikes will suddenly vanish like the penny-farthing once everyone goes electric. Rest assured: e-bikes won’t make human-powered mobility obsolete. They may actually enhance it.

That said, there’s really no better time than right now to start shopping for an electric bike. The market is flooded with battery-powered bikes of all shapes and sizes.
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Federal Report On Fatal Uber Crash Reveals The Tech Wasn’t Equipped To Detect Jaywalkers

November 13, 2019

Raj Rajkumar, an expert on autonomous cars at Carnegie Mellon University, said the past decade of self-driving car development has been like an arms race, and the 2018 fatality was a wakeup call.

“Every company in the space basically got a slap in the face and said ‘Hey, can this happen in our context,'” Rajkumar said. “‘What are we doing to prevent a tragedy like this from happening?'”

Rajkumar said some self-driving car companies have misrepresented how long it will take to perfect the technology.

“Self-driving is not a simple activity, it’s quite complex,” Rajkumar said. “It’s going to take time, many years, so ‘customer beware.'”
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NTSB to Bike Riders: It’s on You to Stop Getting Hit by Drivers

November 13, 2019

At a public meeting in Washington, D.C., where the report was unveiled to the public, NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt framed the urgency of the issues around newly released statistics from the National Highway Travel and Safety Administration indicating that 857 American cyclists were killed in 2018, the worst death toll in three decades.

And yet the top-line proposals from the NTSB largely shifted responsibility to solve this deadly crisis onto cyclists themselves. Two of the three key recommendations focused on the need for riders to wear helmets and be more conspicuous. (The third was about improving road design, which is awesome because poor cycling infrastructure is an actual cause of cycling fatalities.)
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UW-Madison is the latest campus to roll out food delivery robots

November 13, 2019

Dive Brief:
The University of Wisconsin–Madison is the latest institution where students, faculty and staff can have meals and snacks delivered by autonomous robots, one of the most recent tech trends sweeping campuses.

The university announced this week that it has deployed 30 robots on campus. They were created by Starship Technologies and can deliver from three dining halls.

Officials at Starship, which has pledged to expand to 100 campuses within two years, say that UW-Madison is the largest American university to use their services so far.
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