Smart Mobility Challenge Project: Real-time traffic monitoring and prediction for Cranberry Township

February 15, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

February 2018

If you’ve ever traveled through Cranberry Township, you’ve probably had to wait at more than one traffic signal. Cranberry Township’s unique geographical location at the junction of Interstate 79 and the PA Turnpike (PA 376) poses unique challenges in coordinated signal operations. Furthermore, the Township operates a Coordinated Signal System that relies on historically Generated Signal Timings, coupled with real time technology to manage day to day operations on the local network.  Any scheduled or unscheduled events on the limited access highways can cause havoc with operations on roads in the business district.

Jason A. Dailey, Director of Public Works in Cranberry Township saw an opportunity with the Smart Mobility Challenge to reduce havoc and maintain efficiency. Together with CMU faculty, Sean Qian, and PhD

Sean Qian

student, Weiran Yao, the Mobility Data Analytics Center (MAC) received funding from Traffic21.  This research project incorporated real time data inputs monitored from both social media and other public data sources against historical data to trigger predictions of traffic delays at least 30 minutes ahead.  These predictions could then be directed to dynamic message boards, smart phone applications, social media, and text messages to alert the public of the anticipated delay.  These predictions also alert the Cranberry Traffic Operations

Weiran Yao

Center of the incidents to allow for pro-active adjustments to the operating traffic plan on a real-time basis.

At the conclusion of the project, in a real-world demonstration, the system proved to successfully alert the Townships traffic operators of the upcoming traffic gridlock 50 minutes in advance compared to the actual reporting time, which allowed more prompt and effective traffic management.

Dailey’s feedback after working with Traffic21 faculty Sean Qian included:

“This was another great experience working with CMU through the Traffic21 program.  Our project was able to pull existing technology and crowd-sourced data, combine it with other publicly available data that is driven by a multitude of sources including vehicle reporting data and roadway sensors, and produce a recommendation on how to manage our signal system when an event is triggered.  We are very fortunate to work with Traffic21 and MAC to help us take advantage of current technology and make sense of it, in a way that industry professionals can then turn it into real world solutions.  This project built on another project we had been working on with Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission where we developed contingency plans that were preplanned and would need to be first identified manually, and then entered manually into our traffic signal system.  What Sean and his team were able to do, was to create a program that looks locally at traffic inputs, looks regionally at what is happening, identify issues far enough in advance for us to get an alert that then would recommend what signal plan would best resolve the issue that is occurring.  While we still need to manually enter the plan, this project far exceeded our expectations and is showing us just how valuable regional data access is for us.” 

Read the Full Report from Real-Time Traffic Monitoring and Prediction for Cranberry Township: https://ppms.cit.cmu.edu/media/project_files/61-Final.pdf

Inspired by Traffic21’s years of successful collaboration with the City of Pittsburgh to become a globally recognized smart city test bed, the goal of the Smart Mobility Challenge is to demonstrate how suburban and rural communities can also benefit from a similar collaboration.  This program is supported by Carnegie Mellon University’s Traffic21 Institute and its affiliated US DOT National University Transportation Center, Mobility21.

The Smart Mobility Challenge is an opportunity to connect suburban and rural communities to the technologies and resources being developed at Carnegie Mellon University.  The first Smart Mobility Challenge was held from 2017 – 2018, and included research done in collaboration with Millvale, McKees Rocks, Bethel Park, Greensburg, Mt. Lebanon, Dormont, Cranberry Township and Lawrence County.  Learn more by clicking here.

Traffic21 is currently kicking off its Second Smart Mobility Challenge.  The goal of this year’s challenge is work with these communities to use data and analytics to solve their municipality’s mobility problems.  Representatives of municipalities and public transit operators in southwestern PA are invited to request research assistance through the 2019-2020 Smart Mobility Challenge.   Learn more by clicking here.

 

Smart Mobility Connection with Costa Samaras

February 8, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

February 8, 2019

Today’s Smart Mobility Connection featured Costa Samaras, Associate Professor in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at CMU. Costa highlighted his work with the economic, environmental and travel implications of changes in parking choices due to driverless vehicles. Costa’s study estimates the potential impact of privately-owned driverless vehicles on vehicle miles traveled, energy use, emissions, parking revenue, and daily parking cost savings in the city of Seattle, Washington from changes in parking decisions using an agent-based simulation model.  Click here to watch the video recording of this SMC session.

 

 

Mobility21 Executive Director Appointed to CARMA Advisory Group

February 7, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

February 7, 2019

Stan Caldwell, Executive Director of the Mobility21 University Transportation Center was appointed to the advisory group for the Cooperative Automation Research Mobility Applications (CARMA) platform which supports the testing and evaluation of connected and automated vehicle research. This opportunity will have Caldwell directly involved in how research can support advancing the use and implementation of Transportation Systems Management and Operations  strategies and more.

 

Traffic21 Director Appointed as TRB Division Committee Chair

February 6, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

February 5, 2019

Traffic21 Director, Chris Hendrickson was unanimously approved by the National Research Council (NRC) Governing Board to be the new Transportation Research Board (TRB) Division Committee Chair. The  TRB Division Committee  is charged to ensure that NRC procedures and policies are faithfully employed with respect to study and project committee appointments and report review.

Secretary of the Army, Mark Esper, Rides in Mobility21 UTC Automated Vehicle

February 1, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

February 1, 2019

Carnegie Mellon University hosted the Secretary of the Army, Mark Esper and General Murray, Commanding General of the U.S. Army Futures Command and Brigadier General Matthew Easleyfor the announcement that the United States Army is activating its Artificial Intelligence (AI) Task Force at CMU.

The event was hosted at both the National Robotics Engineering Center (NREC) and main campus at CMU.  Secretary Esper and CMU’s president, Farnam Jahanian, rode from CMU’s campus in Oakland to NREC in Lawrenceville in the University Transportation Center’s Autonomous Vehicle. The ride was operated by Mobility21 Director, Raj Rajkumar.

Although CMU is serving as the hub for the AI Task Force, it will eventually include other leading universities from across the country and the privacy sector and close engagement with the Army Research Lab and the Department of Defense’s Artificial Intelligence Center.

The launch of the national network based will give CMU the opportunity to work closely with our partners and grow the robust network of AI collaborators.  Secretary Esper reiterated CMU and Pittsburgh’s commitment to innovation stating “Carnegie Mellon and the Pittsburgh area embody the spirit of hard work and innovation essential to shaping the Army of the future.

UTC Faculty, Jon Peha, Hosted Wireless Research Workshop

January 28, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 28, 2019

Mobility21 UTC Faculty, Jon Peha, hosted a Wireless Research Workshop in partnership with CMU Portugal. The workshop, hosted at the Collaborative Innovation Center included topics such as: Challenges for spectrum management in 5G aerial small cells, A City-Scale Low-Power Wireless Network and Energy efficiency in highly dense environments.

CMU PhD Students Present Poster at TRB

January 24, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 22, 2019

Two PhD students in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University presented their Mobility21 Research during the poster session at the Transportation Annual Research Board in Washington DC.  Rick Grahn’s presented his team’s poster “Public Transit Users and Behaviors in the United States: Evidence from the 2017 National Household Travel Survey” and Corey Harper presented his team’s poster “Net-Societal and Net-Private Benefits of Some Existing Crash Avoidance Technologies.”

Chris Henrickson, Traffic21 Director, Fills In for Speaker at TRB

January 18, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 16, 2019

Chris Hendrickson, the Director of the Carnegie Mellon University Traffic21 Institute was called upon last minute to fill in for a speaker at the TRB session “Future of the Interstate Highway System:  A TRB Consensus Study.”  As a contributing author of the study, he stepped in to provide the session attendees with an overview of the study.

RoadBotics customer Montgomery, Alabama is one of the winners of the Smart 50 Awards in the Mobility category

January 17, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 17, 2019

UTC Spin-off Company, RoadBotics customer Montgomery, Alabama is one of the winners of the Smart 50 Awards in the Mobility category.  Smart 50 Awards, in partnership with Smart Cities Connect, Smart Cities Connect Foundation, and US Ignite, annually recognize global smart cities projects, honoring the most innovative and influential work.   Read more here:  https://spring.smartcitiesconnect.org.

UPenn ESE Team Wins FAA Raise Award

January 15, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 17, 2019

At the 2019 Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, the Executive Committee of the Council of University Transportation Centers on behalf of the Secretary of Transportation, Elaine L. Chao, awarded the Secretary’s RAISE Award to a student team from the University of Pennsylvania (UPENN).  The UPENN senior design team members John Kearney, Max Li, William Tam, and Sahithya Prakash and team advisor, Dr. Megan S. Ryerson, accepted their award. The Secretary’s RAISE award was created to recognize innovative scientific and engineering concepts and student achievements that have the potential to significantly impact the future of aerospace or aviation. The team focused on the design and implementation of a centralized air traffic control (ATC) system for autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (aUAVs) in order to mitigate the risk of aUAV-on-aUAV mid-air collisions.

[UPENN is an academic partner in the Mobility21 University Transportation Center.]

Carnegie Mellon University’s Traffic21 Institute Honors Two “Students of the Year”

January 12, 2019
Posted in What's Happening

January 12, 2019

Amelie Bonde and Kristen Scudder, were honored tonight as “Students of the Year” at the annual winter meeting of the Transportation Research Board in Washington, DC.

Annually, the United States Department of Transportation honors the most outstanding student from each participating University Transportation Center (UTC) for his/her achievements and promise for future contributions to the transportation field. Students of the year are selected based on their accomplishments in such areas as technical merit and research, academic performance, professionalism, and leadership.

Carnegie Mellon University’s Traffic21 Institute houses Mobility21, the National University Transportation Center for Improving Mobility and the T-SET National University Transportation Center for Safety. Students from CMU and University of Pennsylvania were eligible for the T-SET UTC nomination and students from CMU, University of Pennsylvania, The Ohio State University, or Community College of Allegheny County were eligible for the Mobility21 UTC nomination.

Meet our winners:

Mobility21, the National University Transportation Center for Improving Mobility Student of the Year

Amelie Bonde
Amelie Bonde

Amelie Bonde completed a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science in 2014 at Carnegie Mellon University, and is currently a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University. Amelie worked on research pertaining to a structural vibration-based building occupancy estimation system at CMU and more recently on an in-automobile heartbeat monitoring system

using vibration sensors installed in a car seat. She is an NSF Graduate Research Fellow with a focus in the area of cyber-physical systems, smart homes and devices.

Pei Zhang, Carnegie Mellon University Associate Research Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering nominated Amelie for this honor saying, “…She is an amazing researcher that has many novel ideas and will surely be a star researcher one day.”

Amelie’s research thesis is on vibration sensors on vehicle seats that can feel the movement of humans in the car. These small movements can allow for the detection of activities the person is engaged in and biometrics such as heart rate and breath rate, with an aim of assessing driver stress and distractedness.

T-SET National University Transportation Center for Safety Student of the Year

Kristen Scudder
Kristen Scudder

Kristen Scudder is pursuing a Master of City and Regional Planning with a concentration in Sustainable Infrastructure and Transportation from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to graduate school, she received her B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Southern California and spent 6 years as a structural engineer and data automation specialist on global infrastructure projects. In addition to using eye tracking to perform safe mobility research for Mobility21 Research Director Dr. Ryerson, Kristen serves on the Penn Student Transportation Club board and is a Freight and Aviation Planning Intern at The Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission.

Her nominator, Megan S. Ryerson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of City and Regional Planning, PennDesign, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, PennEngineering and Associate Dean for Research, PennDesign at the University of Pennsylvania described Kristen as “…Kristen is a standout Master of City Planning student at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. Kristen brings a rigorous background in Civil and Environmental Engineering to her urban planning education, and she is combining these fields to tackle complex issues including the design of urban transportation infrastructure for safety and designing routing plans and policies for urban freight vehicles.”

Kristen’s research focuses on planning urban infrastructure, city planners and traffic engineers use aggregate data, such as pedestrian and cyclist flow counts and the number of reported crashes per intersection, to identify critically unsafe locations. By using eye tracking data on how pedestrians and cyclists perceive surrounding infrastructure, street design convention can be expanded beyond relying on pre-set road designs and killed and seriously injured (KSI) as a metric for safety.

Educating, recruiting and training new workers is critical to managing our country’s infrastructure safely and efficiently. We strive to help develop a transportation workforce capable of designing and maintaining the complex transportation systems of tomorrow. Help us congratulate our 2018 UTC Students of the Year!

To learn more about the University Transportation Centers’ Student of the Year awards please click here: https://www.transportation.gov/utc/outstanding-students-year

Smart Circuit self-driving shuttles fuel Ohio State research

December 21, 2018
Posted in News

The initiative bringing self-driving shuttles to the Buckeye state is driven by Smart Columbus and Ohio Department of Transportation’s DriveOhio, in partnership with The Ohio State University. The Smart Circuit demonstration will help engineers, researchers and policymakers from this partnership inform future deployments of self-driving vehicle technology throughout the state…

Ohio State’s Institute for Materials Research hosted a three-day INNOVATE-O-thon event in November with DriveOhio, an initiative working to advance smart mobility in Ohio. Each semester, IMR challenges undergraduates studying a variety of disciplines to work with each other, as well as faculty, industry and government representatives to a solve real-world problem.

At the most recent INNOVATE-O-thon, students were challenged to help shape DriveOhio’s technology strategy by imagining a future with self-driving shuttles on the Columbus campus of Ohio State. Students built value propositions for that project and pitched them to government representatives, faculty and other subject matter experts.
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Ohio’s first autonomous shuttle will start accepting passengers

December 12, 2018
Posted in News

Passengers can ride Ohio’s first self-driving shuttle along the Scioto Mile starting Monday.

Smart Circuit will operate from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week at no charge to riders. Smart Columbus and DriveOhio, in partnership with Ohio State University, are leading the initiative. The shuttles are operated by May Mobility, a Michigan-based startup. The Ohio Department of Transportation’s DriveOhio is the state agency devoted to autonomous-vehicle research.

“Smart Circuit gives us an opportunity to learn more about self-driving technology in real time as we work to improve our city’s transportation ecosystem,” Columbus Mayor Andrew J. Ginther said in a news release.

The shuttle, which reaches a maximum speed of 25 miles per hour, will make four stops along the 1.4-mile route along the Scioto Mile at COSI, the National Veterans Memorial and Museum, Bicentennial Park and the Smart Columbus Experience Center.
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GHSA Visits CMU for AV Tour

December 11, 2018
Posted in What's Happening

December 11, 2018

The Government Highway Safety Association visited Carnegie Mellon University to learn more about Mobility21’s policy, technology, people in autonomous vehicles. They spent time learning more about the AV’s here on campus and visiting the Navigation Lab.

Mobility21 Program Manager Attends PAIC Groundbreaking

December 6, 2018
Posted in What's Happening

December 6, 2018

Mobility21 Program Manager, Lisa Kay Schweyer, joined Carnegie Mellon’s Chief of Staff and Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, Daryl Weinhert at the Pittsburgh Airport Innovation Campus (PAIC) Groundbreaking. The PAIC will provide space at the airport for innovation testbeds for aviation and customer service technologies.    

Elsie Hillman Honors Scholar Presents Research at PennState

December 6, 2018
Posted in What's Happening

December 6, 2018

Teresa Leatherow, an Elsie Hillman Honors Scholar working with Traffic21, presented her semester’s research on automation and long-haul trucking at the Pennsylvania State University Transportation Engineering and Safety Conference. Other topics that were presented on by students include dedicated bus lanes, network resilience, and parking demand models for urban areas. Conference attendees were able to participate in various breakout sessions on safety, operations, planning, design, and technology and had the opportunity hear from Pennsylvania Secretary of Transportation Leslie Richards!

PlanetM awards more than $224,000 to three mobility startups to launch pilots in Michigan

December 6, 2018
Posted in News

PlanetM awarded grants to HAAS Alert, Humanising Autonomy and RoadBotics to launch pilots that address real-world transportation challenges throughout Michigan as part of the PlanetM Startup Grant program. One of the first of its kind, the PlanetM Pilot Grants provide mobility startups funds to deploy and validate their technologies in Michigan…

An infrastructure technology company, RoadBotics specializes in using artificial intelligence (AI) to generate automated pavement condition data. RoadBotics will use the grant to implement its AI pavement inspection technology into Detroit’s roads to analyze the condition of the City’s 2,600-mile road network and build a robust data-driven pavement management strategy for the City of Detroit.
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Two CMU Students Selected as 2018 Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship Program Awardees

December 5, 2018
Posted in What's Happening

December 5, 2018

Matt Battifarano and Rick Grahn, both PhD students in Carnegie Mellon University’s Civil and Environmental Engineering Department were selected as prestigious Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship Program awardees.

Matt Battifarano
Matt Battifarano

Before starting his coursework at CMU, Matt Battifarano spent three years as a data scientist at Bridj, a smart urban transportation startup where he built models of transit demand within a city and methods to optimize vehicle routes to meet that demand. He received my Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics with a minor in Computational Neuroscience from the University of Chicago in 2012.

Rick Grahn
Rick Grahn

Rick Grahn worked as a structural engineer and obtained his Professional Engineer certification in the State of California before enrolling in CMU.  He also served a year with Americorps providing affordable housing to residents in Oakland, CA. He has a BS in Civil Engineering (2009) and MS in Structural Engineering (2011) from the University of New Mexico.

The mission of the Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship Program is to attract the nation’s brightest minds to the field of transportation and advance transportation workforce development. The DDETFP is managed by Technology Partnership Program, Federal Highway Administration. The DDETFP encompasses all modes of transportation.

The DDETFP awards are fellowships to students pursuing degrees in transportation-related disciplines. This program advances the transportation workforce by helping to attract the nation’s brightest minds to the field of transportation, encouraging future transportation professionals to seek advanced degrees, and helping to retain top talent in the U.S. transportation industry.

From its initial support of graduate research fellowships in 1983, to the current program’s inception in the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the DDETFP has awarded over $50 million to the brightest minds in the transportation industry. From this investment, fellows have pushed for innovative change in multimodal areas from highway infrastructure to aviation to maritime, making the industry more effective and efficient. Fellows pursue careers in academia, private industry, and public service, becoming leaders across the nation.

DDETFP awards are merit-based and generally result in 150-200 grants annually, subject to the availability of funds.

[Source: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/innovativeprograms/centers/workforce_dev/post_secondary_education.aspx]

Congratulations to Matt and Rick for being selected as 2018 Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship Program Awardees!

Ohio State helps introduce new smart shuttles to Columbus

December 4, 2018
Posted in What's Happening

December 4, 2018

Engineers from Ohio State’s Center for Automotive Research are playing a key role in a new line of self-driving shuttles expected to debut in Columbus next month. Maryn Weimer, senior associate director of CAR, said DriveOhio goes to CAR for research purposes to make sure safety and efficiency goals are met. Read the full article

 

Traffic21/Mobility21 Director participates in Paving the Way for AV hosted by Babst Calland

November 27, 2018
Posted in What's Happening

November 27, 2018

Stan Caldwell, CMU Executive Director of Traffic21 and Mobility21 participated with Justine Kasznica of law firm Babst Calland’s Mobility, Transport and Safety practice on the panel Paving the Way for Autonomous Vehicles hosted by Babst Calland.  The presentation included a discussion about autonomous vehicles in the broader context of infrastructure design and development, and issues related to urban infrastructure and research and advancements in mobility technologies.

Smart car technologies save drivers $6.2 billion on fuel costs each year

November 21, 2018
Posted in News

On one of the busiest traveling holidays of the year, drivers may be focusing on getting to grandma’s house for Thanksgiving dinner, not on what smart car technologies are saving them in fuel costs. But in the first study to assess the energy impact of smart technology in cars, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have put a number on the potential fuel-cost savings alone: $6.2 billion.

“That’s not insignificant,” said Yeganeh Hayeri, an assistant professor at Stevens whose work lies at the intersection of civil and environmental engineering and public policy. “That translates to between $60 and $266 in the pocket of car owners every year, not to mention additional savings created for each driver due to more smoothly-flowing traffic, fewer accidents and aerodynamic efficiency of all other vehicles on the road.”…

To figure out the impact of these technologies on fuel-saving cost, Hayeri and her colleagues at Stevens, including Saeed Vasebi, a graduate student in Hayeri’s lab, and Carnegie Mellon University conducted a comprehensive review of the literature on the energy and safety impacts of automated features, providing precise data for predicting how these features would affect fuel consumption nationwide.

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Ohio State helps introduce new smart shuttles to Columbus

November 20, 2018
Posted in News

DriveOhio’s new shuttles will operate along the Scioto Mile, allowing passengers to travel to the Smart Columbus Experience Center, COSI, the National Veterans Memorial and Museum, and Bicentennial Park…

The project comes from the combined work of DriveOhio, a new initiative within the Ohio Department of Transportation; Smart Columbus, an initiative focused on improving economic growth and quality of life through technological advancements; and Ohio State University….

Engineers at Ohio State’s Center for Automotive Research, or CAR, have played a key role in making this project possible. Maryn Weimer, senior associate director of CAR, said DriveOhio goes to CAR for research purposes to make sure safety and efficiency goals are met.

Weimer said while this is the first major project CAR and DriveOhio have collaborated on, but that CAR already had a dedication to smart mobility and vehicle autonomy in its recent projects.
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CCAC Presents Mission Critical: Filling Tomorrows Jobs

November 15, 2018
Posted in What's Happening

November 15, 2018

CCAC hosted an event titled “Mission Critical: Filling Tomorrow’s Jobs” where they discussed how business and labor can collectively address the rising challenges of the growing skills gap and anticipated worker shortage.

Mobility21 Exec. Director Gives Lecture at Osher

November 15, 2018
Posted in What's Happening

November 15, 2018

Mobility21 Executive Director Stan Caldwell provided a guest lecture at the Urban Planning Choices course of the Carnegie Mellon University Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.   He presented Mobility21 research and highlighted the policy implications of new technologies disrupting transportation and urban planning.

UTC Professor’s Group Published 6 Papers for ITSC Conference

November 14, 2018
Posted in What's Happening

November 2018

Two CMU PhD students, Mansur Arief and Jiacheng Zhu, from Mechanical Engineering ME presented at the ITSC conference. UTC Professor, Ding Zhao and his group published 6 papers in this conference, which is considered to the top conference in the autonomous vehicles field.

Mansur Arief, Peter Glynn, Ding Zhao, ”An Accelerated Approach to Safely and Efficiently Test Pre-production Autonomous Vehicles on Public Streets,” Proceedings of the IEEE 20th International Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference (ITSC), Hawaii, USA, November 4-7, 2018.

Jiacheng Zhu, Wenshuo Wang, Ding Zhao, ”A Tempt to Unify Heterogeneous Driving Databases using Traffic Primitives,” Proceedings of the IEEE 20th International Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference (ITSC), Hawaii, USA, November 4-7, 2018.

Xun Gong, Yaohui Guo, Yiheng Feng, Jing Sun, Ding Zhao, ”Evaluation of the Energy Efficiency in a Mixed Traffic with Automated Vehicles and Human Controlled Vehicles,” Proceedings of the IEEE 20th International Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference (ITSC), Hawaii, USA, November 4-7, 2018.

Zhiyuan Huang, Mansur Arief, Henry Lam, Ding Zhao, ”Synthesis of Different Autonomous Vehicles Test Approaches,” Proceedings of the IEEE 20th International Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference (ITSC), Hawaii, USA, November 4-7, 2018.

Yan Chang, Weiqing Yang, Ding Zhao, ”Fuel Economy and Emission Testing for Connected and Automated Vehicles Using Real-world Driving Datasets,” Proceedings of the IEEE 20th International Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference (ITSC), Hawaii, USA, November 4-7, 2018.

Songan Zhang, Huei Peng, Eric Tseng, Ding Zhao, “Accelerated Evaluation of Autonomous Vehicles in the Lane Change Scenario Based on Subset Simulation Technique,” Proceedings of the IEEE 20th International Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference (ITSC), Hawaii, USA, November 4-7, 2018.